International Journal of Dental Sciences

International Journal of Dental Sciences


International Journal of Dental Sciences
International Journal of Dental Sciences
Vol. 3, Issue 1 (2021)

Dentoalveolar fracture treatment and management: A review article


Nanda Rachmad Putra Gofur, Aisyah Rachmadani Putri Gofur, Soesilaningtyas, Rizki Nur Rachman Putra Gofur, Mega Kahdina, Hernalia Martadila Putri

Dentoalveolar fracture (DAF) is quite common and usually seen as an emergency. Dentoalveolar fracture may be defined as that fracture in which displacement, subluxation, avulsion or fracture of the teeth occurs in association with fracture of the alveolus. Alveolar process is that part of the mandible and maxilla, which surround and support the teeth. The alveolar process is formed with the development and eruption of teeth and conversely it gradually diminishes in height after the loss of teeth. Alveolar process is that part of the mandible and maxilla, which surround and support the teeth. The alveolar process is formed with the development and eruption of teeth and conversely it gradually diminishes in height after the loss of teeth. The study shows that majority of the patients were in their young age. Males were more common than females. The most common etiological factor was road traffic accident, followed by fall. In the light of present study the following recommendations are made. Discussion: Most alveolar fractures occur in the premolar and incisor regions. The treatment of these fractures involves proper reduction and rapid stabilization. Manipulation by pressure and rigid stabilization of the fragments are accepted closed-reduction techniques. Major displacement or difficulty with closed reduction may necessitate open reduction. Alignment of the involved teeth, edema of the segments, restoration of proper occlusion, and edema of the teeth in the fractured segment are important. The removal of teeth with no bony support may be considered, but should not be performed before the fractured bony segments have healed, even if the teeth are considered to be unsalvageable. Segment edema can be performed with acrylic or metal cap splints, orthodontic bands, fibreglass splints, transosseous wires, small or mini cortical plates, or transgingival lag screws; these materials should be applied for at least 4 weeks. Conclusion: Dentoalveolar fracture management is required using archbar treatment, we believe that this technique could also be helpful in providing rapid MMF to stabilize maxillofacial fractures during mass casualties such as war injuries or natural calamities.
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